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Anthony Bell
Anthony Bell

Credit Score Chart [Extra Quality]



A credit score is a three-digit number that is calculated from information on a credit report and generally ranges between 300 and 850. A good credit score is 670 to 739 on the FICO Score range, while a credit score of 661 to 780 is good on the VantageScore range.




credit score chart


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A credit score ranges from 300 to 850 and is a numerical rating that measures a person's likelihood to repay a debt. A higher credit score signals that a borrower is lower risk and more likely to make on-time payments. Credit scores are often used to help determine the likelihood someone will pay what they owe on debts such as loans, mortgages, credit cards, rent and utilities. Lenders may use credit scores to evaluate loan qualification, credit limit and interest rate.


In part, this depends on the types of borrowers they want to attract. Creditors may also take into account how current events could impact consumers' credit scores, and adjust their requirements accordingly. Some lenders create their own custom credit scoring programs, but the two most commonly used credit scoring models are the ones developed by FICO and VantageScore.


FICO creates different types of consumer credit scores. There are "base" FICO Scores that the company makes for lenders in multiple industries to use, as well as industry-specific credit scores for credit card issuers and auto lenders.


FICO uses percentages to represent generally how important each category is, though the exact percentage breakdown used to determine your credit score will depend on your unique credit report. FICO considers scoring factors in the following order:


VantageScore lists the factors by how influential they generally are in determining a credit score, but this will also depend on your unique credit report. VantageScore considers factors in the following order:


FICO industry-specific scores are built on top of a base FICO Score, and FICO periodically releases new suites of scores. The FICO Score 10 Suite, for instance, was announced in early 2020. It includes a base FICO Score 10, a FICO Score 10 T (which includes trended data) and new industry-specific scores.


There are scores used more rarely as well. For instance, FICO is slowly rolling out the UltraFICO Score, which allows consumers to link checking, savings or money market accounts and considers banking activity. Lenders may also create custom credit scoring models designed with their target customers in mind.


As a result, the same factors can impact all your credit scores. If you monitor multiple credit scores, you could find that your scores vary depending on the scoring model and which one of your credit reports it analyzes. But, over time, you may see they all tend to rise and fall together.


For example, the difference between taking out a 30-year, fixed-rate $250,000 mortgage with a 670 FICO Score and a 720 FICO Score could be $72 a month. That's extra money you could be putting toward your savings or other financial goals. Over the lifetime of the loan, having a good score could save you $26,071 in interest payments.


Your credit reports (but not consumer credit scores) can also impact you in other ways. Some employers may review your credit reports before making a hiring or promotion decision. And, in most states, insurance companies may use credit-based insurance scores to help determine your premiums for auto, home and life insurance.


Checking your credit scores might also give you insight into what you can do to improve them. For example, when you check your FICO Score 8 from Experian for free, you can also look to see how you're doing with each of the credit score categories.


You may be able to point to a specific event that leads to a score change. For example, a late payment or new collection account will likely lower your credit score. Conversely, paying down a high credit card balance and lowering your utilization rate may increase your score.


But some actions might have an impact on your credit scores that you didn't expect. Paying off a loan, for example, might lead to a drop in your scores, even though it's a positive action in terms of responsible money management. This could be because it was the only open installment account you had on your credit report or the only loan with a low balance. After paying off the loan, you may be left without a mix of open installment and revolving accounts, or with only high-balance loans.


Perhaps you decide to stop using your credit cards after paying off the balances. Avoiding debt is a good idea, but lack of activity in your accounts could lead to a lower score. You may want to use a card for a small monthly subscription and then pay off the balance in full each month to maintain your account's activity and build its on-time payment history.


Your bank, credit union, lender or credit card issuer may give you free access to one of your credit scores. Experian also lets you check your FICO Score 8 based on your Experian credit report for free.


The type of credit score you get can depend on the source. Some services may offer you a version of your FICO Score, while others offer VantageScore credit scores. In either case, the calculated score will also depend on which credit report the scoring model analyzes.


Potential lenders and creditors look at your credit score as one factor when deciding whether to offer you new credit. Lenders may also use your credit score to set the interest rates and other terms for any credit they offer.


Overall, the higher your credit score is, the more likely you are to appeal to lenders. Higher credit scores indicate that a borrower has demonstrated responsible credit behavior in the past. So, they also often receive more favorable terms and interest rates from lenders.


Your credit score is calculated using the information found on your credit report. Your payment history, the mix of credit accounts you have, the length of your credit history and your credit utilization rate (the percentage of available credit limits you are using) are all factors that might influence your credit scores.


However, there's more than one way to calculate your credit scores. Lenders and credit reporting agencies often use different scoring models. One model might place the most importance on your payment history. Another could prioritize the types of credit you have available. Because of these differences, your score could vary depending on how it was calculated.


Your scores may also vary based on the credit reporting agency providing them. This is because not all lenders and creditors report information to all three nationwide consumer reporting agencies (Equifax, TransUnion and Experian). Some may report to only two, one or none at all.


The good news is your credit score is not a fixed number. With time and responsible choices, it can be improved. Just keep in mind that this process takes patience. This is especially true if you haven't kept the best credit habits in the past.


Some credit habits that could improve your score in the long term include making your payments on time, keeping old accounts open to lengthen your credit history and keeping your credit utilization rate low.


You'll also want to make sure to keep tabs on your credit report to confirm that the information included is up to date. Credit reports do not include your credit scores, but here are a few ways you can check your credit scores.


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Your FICO Scores are unique, just like you. They are calculated based on the five categories referenced above, but for some people, the importance of these categories can be different. For example, scores for people who have not been using credit long will be calculated differently than those with a longer credit history.


Your credit report and FICO Scores evolve frequently. Because of this, it's not possible to measure the exact impact of a single factor in how your FICO Score is calculated without looking at your entire report. Even the levels of importance shown in the FICO Scores chart above are for the general population and may be different for different credit profiles.


All FICO Score products made available on myFICO.com include a FICO Score 8, and may include additional FICO Score versions. Your lender or insurer may use a different FICO Score than the versions you receive from myFICO, or another type of credit score altogether. Learn more


FICO, myFICO, Score Watch, The score lenders use, and The Score That Matters are trademarks or registered trademarks of Fair Isaac Corporation. Equifax Credit Report is a trademark of Equifax, Inc. and its affiliated companies. Many factors affect your FICO Scores and the interest rates you may receive. Fair Isaac is not a credit repair organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. Fair Isaac does not provide "credit repair" services or advice or assistance regarding "rebuilding" or "improving" your credit record, credit history or credit rating. FTC's website on credit.


A credit score is a three-digit number, typically between 300 and 850, designed to represent your credit risk, or the likelihood you will pay your bills on time. Creditors and lenders consider your credit scores as one factor when deciding whether to approve you for a new account. Your credit scores may also impact the interest rate and other terms on any loan or other credit account for which you qualify. 041b061a72


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